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20130131
20130131
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the united states senate has just voted to extend the nation's debt ceiling for multiple months. the new deadline now will be may 19th, and that tees up now the next fiscal fight here in washington which will come on march the 1st. it will be over the so-called sequester. all of those automatic spending cuts, will they be allowed to go into effect? that will now be the next big question we wrestle with here in washington, maria. >> thanks so much. >> january jobs figures taking center stage first thing tomorrow morning as the white house shutters its jobs council. hampton pearson on what's sure to move the markets. >> reporter: hi, maria. tomorrow's job reports will have two part, the headline numbers on jobs and the unemployment rate. our cnbc survey predicts employers increasing non-farm payrolls by 1 of,000 jobs versus 155,000 in december. the unemployment rate holding steady at 7.8%. now today we heard that first-time unemployment claims actually jumped by 38000 to a seasonally adjusted 368,000, that according to the labor department. lost in yesterday's focus on negative gdp was the
. and the senate gave final approval to suspending the national debt ceiling into may. online we profile a social entrepreneur who works as matchmaker between international artisans and retailers. kwame holman explains. >> holman: in our agents for change series, meet the woman in charge of nest, an organization that helps talented, aspiring craftspeople build successful businesses and connect to consumers. that's on the rundown. should parents worry about kids consuming highly caffeinated energy drinks? health correspondent betty ann bowser asks a psycho- pharmacologist. and on making sense, economist dean baker weighs in on the causes of rising economic inequality in the united states. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. jeff? >> brown: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm jeffrey brown. >> brown: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among others. thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve s
to suspending the national debt ceiling into may. online we profile a social entrepreneur who works as matchmaker between international artisans and retailers. kwame holman explains. >> holman: in our agents for change series, meet the woman in charge of nest, an organization that helps talented, aspiring craftspeople build successful businesses and connect to consumers. that's on the rundown. should parents worry about kids consuming highly caffeinated energy drinks? health correspondent betty ann bowser asks a psycho- pharmacologist. and on making sense, economist dean baker weighs in on the causes of rising economic inequality in the united states. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. jeff? >> brown: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm jeffrey brown. >> brown: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among others. thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental
or not to raise the nation's debt ceiling. we have more live from cnbc. good morning. >>> good morning, the senate is expected to vote today on a bill to suspend the debt ceiling or the u.s. borrowing limit for three months to allow more time for debate on the country's fiscal issues. the house passed a measure last week. the senate version includes several republican amendments including matching spending cuts for every dollar increase in the debt ceiling. but they're expected to go down in defeat. now the bill won't technically raise the debt ceiling but will spend it until may 19 when it will be raised by the amount the treasury borrows in the interim. meanwhile, a new report finds foreclosure activity rose in more than half of the biggest u.s. metro areas last year. but realty track says activity decreased from 2010 when foreclosures peaked in most markets. foreclosures dropped in 12 of the top 20 metro markets with the biggest declines in phoenix, san francisco, and detroit. the biggest increases were in tampa, miami, and baltimore. and what are the top market for buying a foreclosed home thi
final approval today to a measure that would at least put off the debate over raising the debt ceiling. this measure expense the government's borrowing limit to may 19th. the national debt will be pushing the $17 trillion. in other words, it's really washington's version of kicking the can down the road. the president is expected to sign this bill immediately. >>> now to the economy and the financial markets. stocks fell a bit today with all three major indexes modestly lower. but for the month, the dow was up almost 6%, the best since january in '94. nasdaq gabd 4%, s&p just over 6. its best january since '97. what is the market surge trying to tell us when mixed in with some bad news out there, as well? and on the eve of another big jobs report? our report from nbc's tom costello. >> reporter: 25-year-old kory wilson can tell you, it's not easy looking for a job. she has applied for 200 since earning a masters degree in public relations last may of the. >> being a post graduate, either i'm overqualified or i'm underqualified. >> she is looking for work, but the economy seemingly pois
ceiling being an issue. i think it would be foolish to hold the nation hostage by having a fight over the debt ceiling. i think we'll see it with sequestration. that's coming march 1st, not too far away and with the budget and the continuing resolutions. i think that's where the real fight will be, and i think we're seeing the consequences of an economy that's not investing, a government that has to pull back and what we saw in the gdp report yesterday, and, you know, who knows what we'll see tomorrow on the jobs report, but it's slowed down the economy and we're all waiting. >> absolutely. mark, good to have you on the program. thanks very much. >> thanks, maria, thanks, scott. >> we'll see you soon. the dow on pace for the best in 19 years or 24 years. it all depends on how you finish this hour. might be surprised to know that hewlett-packard is the top dow performer this month, and bank of america the worst. a quick reversal there of fortune because that was the exact opposite what have happened in 2012. so which stock do you want to buy right now? let's start talking numbers on th
followed the house of representatives in the past legislation extending the nation's debt ceiling, this time at least until may 19th. but for practical purposes, probably a few months longer than that. the vote in the senate, 64-34. the bill passed the house next week and will sign it into law. there will be an increase in the nation's debt limit, at least for the next few months. they will battle over this later down the road. other news we're following, three stories involving high-profile shootings at a time when the nation is struggling with the issue of guns. lisa sylvester is monitoring that. some of the other top stories in "the situation room." lisa, what's the latest? >> at least one person has been shot at a middle school in atlanta. the victim was conscious and breathing when taken to a local hospital. the suspected gunman is believed to be a student and is in custody. >>> police outside of dallas are investigating the shooting of a prosecutor. district attorney mark haas was gunned down this morning outside the county courthouse. police aren't sure whether haas was tar
's face it. when you have the debt ceiling, the threat of default taken off the table, pretty much unilaterally, that's a good thing for let's call it the cause of sanity. but the national leadership such as it is is not in control of these primaries. you know, they've given the keys of their car to several not qualified to drive people for several years now, and what should have been a split, what should have been a splinter party, which would have died like the ross perot movement, like pat buchanan's primary supporters, they decided to say they were all one, and that's their problem. they should have allowed this to drift away, and it would have done, as the economy has picked up, and these movements are tip cal at times of economic hardship. remember that the tea party protests were not just talking about the president. they were talking about bail-outs. they didn't like tarp. which republicans voted for. there was a lot of economic griefance there, and that typically fuels these things. it would have gone away, but made a real strategic blunder. >> the question is -- i'm curio
today the senate will vote on the house-passed legislation to suspend the debt ceiling until the summer and remove the specter of default hanging over the nation's economy. i suspect this will pass sending the message long and clear that while we're willing to negotiate on many things, we will not engay inch in another -- engage in another irresponsible debate over whether the united states government should pay its bills. most of my republican colleagues voted for the spending. what are some of those bills we've incurred? mr. president, we've had two wars going on that have been unpaid for with real money. we borrowed the money p. every republican voted for these wars. so we should pay our bills. i was reassured by house republicans' decision last week to back off their reckless threat to hold the debt ceiling hostage. dosuspending the debt limit will ensure we pay the bills we've already incurred. the legislation before the senate sets an important precedent that the full fanal and credit of the -- the full faith and credit of the united states will no longer be used as a pawn to extr
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)